Beer Review: Samuel Adams Harvest Pumpkin Beer

maurice amon beerWith all this crazy weather in the northeast, I started really missing my favorite season of the year, Fall. I decided the best way to do this without actually going outside and was to have a Harvest Pumpkin Ale by Samuel Adams. Don’t ask where I got this in February, I have connections. My connection includes a flight of a lot of goodies. Anywho, so Samuel Adams has always been one of my favorite ales and nothing says Fall like a good pumpkin Ale. Mostly, because it is a pumpkin Ale that tastes like pumpkin! Let’s dive into this.

Here’s the description according to Samuel Adams:

“A perennial favorite at our brewery Halloween party, Samuel Adams Harvest Pumpkin Ale is brewed with over 11 pounds of real pumpkin per barrel, adding a full body and sweetness to this dark reddish amber brew.  Deep roasted malts, including a smoked malt, lend a distinct roasted character while traditional pumpkin pie spices give the beer a subtle spice note.” – Samuel Adams

maurice amonSo in terms of the taste, it is definitely one of the more authentic ales on the market. Upon first hitting the palate you get a clear taste of a variety of flavors and spices that you associate with Fall. Aside from pumpkin, you also taste cloves, spices, nutmeg and of course pumpkin. This paired well with the pumpkin aroma making it pleasant to anyone who consumes this. Though there is a slight bitterness in the aftertaste, which is always expected when it comes to beer. All in all, the finish is a bit dry.

The color is a nice amber/copper color with a nice off-white fizzy head which leads plenty of lacing around the glass. This color definitely aids in the bringing the flavor to life. The flavor mirrors the aroma as well as the color which is pleasant as best. From an “ale” standpoint, there are some mild grassy and hop notes present which helps this not feel or taste like a straight cider.

Out of 5, I would rate this beer a 4. I would definitely purchase as well as order this from a bar. I absolutely loved the taste, and appreciated it for not being too much of a cider tasting ale.

Beer is Beer, Right?

Maurice Amon

Since the boom in microbreweries in the early two-thousands, countless varieties of beer have been brewed and imagined! There are spicy beers, sweet beers, rich beers, meek beers, high and low gravity, common and unique beers.

Some go down with an “ooohhhh,” some go down with an “ahhhh,” some are tasty with chocolate, some pair nicely with ‘za. We all love meeting friends for a nice pint or two, and sometimes having one all alone – don’t you?

The two main types of beer are lagers and ales, this distinction is important – it’s knowledge avails. Lagers ferment on bottom, ales on the top, with a different selection of grain, yeast, and hop.

Ales are brewed in warm water, by the timeless tradition, and that’s how they’re distinctly ales, by definition. Often fruity in flavor, refreshing, and sweet, great things come when you ferment warm water with wheat!

Lagers ferment in a bath that’s kept cold, and that’s how it’s decided by what name they’re sold. Also brewed in cold water are pilsners and bocks, and they ferment for longer…don’t wait by the clock!

Whatever your fancy, whatever your whim, hold up your glass proudly, fill up to the brim! For now you know the difference ‘tween lagers and ales, may the knowledge help guide you down beer-laden trails

Since the microbrew BOOM in the early two-thousands,

Countless beer styles have been brewed and imagined!

Hop monsters, barrel-aged, spicy smoke freak beers,

Wine grape ales, barleywines; uncommon unique beers.

Some go down with ‘OOHS’, some go down with an “AHH,”

Some pair with fine cheeses, some cry out for ‘za.

We all love meeting friends for a nice pint or two,

and sometimes having one all alone – don’t you?

There’s two types of beer: lagers and ales,

The distinction’s important – the knowledge avails.

Lagers ferment on bottom, ales on the top,

With different yeasts joining malt, water, and hop.

Ales are brewed in warm water, by timeless tradition,

And that’s how they’re distinctly ales, by definition.

Often fruity in flavor, refreshing, and sweet,

Great things come when you ferment warm water with wheat!

Lagers ferment in a bath that’s kept cold,

That’s how we decide by what name they are sold.

Lagers include dunkels, pilsners, and bocks,

They ferment longer…don’t wait by the clock!

Whatever your fancy, whatever your whim,

Hold your glass proudly, filled to the brim!

You now know the difference ‘tween lagers and ales!

May the knowledge help guide you down beer-laden trails!